Movement Building Politics: Pramila Jayapal and Chase Iron Eyes

 

At the Laura Flanders Show, we say we talk with “tomorrow’s heroes today.”  One of those could well be forward-thinker Pramila Jayapal, Washington State Senator, now running for Congress. If elected, Jayapal be the first south Asian woman in the House of Representatives.  Jayapal describes herself as a “proud immigrant from India.” She founded Hate Free Zone (now OneAmerica) in response to hate and discrimination after the Sept. 11 terrorist attack and played a big role in the push for a $15 minimum wage. Hear how Islamophobic racism, has shaped her campaign and why she believes politicians must address institutional racism head-on. Pramila Jayapal is running for Washington, U.S. House of Representatives, District 7.

 

Also running for Congress is Chase Iron Eyes, a populist candidate for indigenous voters and a leading organizer for the #NoDAPL fight. We talk with Iron Eyes about lifting up in the face of oppression. Chase Iron Eyes is a Native activist and attorney, and a member of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe.


All this, and Laura’s F Word on opening highways not gates.

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Are we stuck in a two-party gridlock, or is there still room for democracy? Ralph Nader, former presidential candidate and famed political maverick, joins us to discuss what really constitutes “people power” when it comes to this election. Known for his lifetime advocacy for electoral reform and corporate accountability, Nader talks about what the 2016 election’s taught us about the need for a government overhaul. For Nader, the choice between what he calls a “warmonger” and an  “empty suit,” is no choice at all. But that doesn’t mean voters can’t make a difference, especially on Congress.


Nader is the author a new book, Breaking Through Power: It’s Easier Than We Think.”  Also in this episode, a look at those most integral to this election: the voters, with a retrospective from the Democratic National Convention, more from the fight at Standing Rock and an F Word from Laura on winner-take-all media coverage.

From the F-Word, a link to Arun Gupta's bombastic article on what stakes the Left has in this election.

 

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We Gon' To Be Alright - Really: Jeff Chang

It may seem at times like there’s a thousand movements to be a part of, a thousand and one tragedies in the news. How do we keep ourselves accountable to the communities we truly care about? Is "diversity" enough? And how do we stop ourselves from panicking? Our guest this week, celebrated journalist and author Jeff Chang takes on some of these questions. According to Chang, hope isn’t yet lost and really, we’re going to be alright -- if we work together.

Connecting the dots between modern American resegregation, the 2016 elections, the Black Lives Matter Movement, and the “hip-hop generation,” Chang paints a picture of distress. Yet, there’s power in this, says Chang. Collaboration, the likes of which we see in successful movements everywhere (Movement for Black Lives, #NoDAPL), can ebb the flow of oppression. Jeff Chang is the co-founder of CultureStr/ke and Colorlines. He currently serves as the executive director for Stanford University's Institute for Diversity in the Arts. His latest release, “We Gon Be Alright,” from Picador, is in stores now.

Also in this episode, we see a movement in practice at Standing Rock in Očhéthi Šakówiŋ territory. Indigenous activists and nations across the country are joining together in a historic effort to protect the water and defend the land against corporate energy. These indigenous leaders can teach us a lesson about doing radical work, even when facing improbable odds.

From the F-Word, a link to Arun Gupta's bombastic article on what stakes the Left has in this election.

Find out more at www.lauraflanders.com. For Jeff Chang's other works, http://jeffchang.net/

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RISE With Standing Rock

There's a revolution happening in #StandingRock, at the Očhéthi Šakówiŋ camp, and across the country. Over 200 indigenous American nations and 6,000 people have travelled to the community in an unprecedented act of solidarity.

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Fiscal Feminism: Pavlina R. Tcherneva

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fqmy5F98SAs

This week, we are joined by economist and professor Pavlina R. Tcherneva, who says the current practice of gender-blind and race-blind fiscal policy lacks visions and helps no one. Congress, according to Tcherneva is focusing on the wrong things.

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Special Report from #StandingRock: Part 1

 

Part 1 of our field reports from the Očhéthi Šakówiŋ, or Seven Council Fires Community, at #StandingRock in Cannonball, North Dakota. Representatives from over 200 nations have travelled to #StandingRock to defend their right to clean water, and more, to preserve their sovereignty against a state that has illegally decided to take this land. They are protectors, not protesters. Their historic effort is bringing attention to a long struggle against environmental racism, indiscriminate raids, and genocidal erasure.

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Is A Socialist Future Possible? Sarah Leonard & Bhaskar Sunkara

Few words have had as little presence in the 2016 election as “socialism,” which was raised briefly in one of the earliest primary debates. Yet socialism could have a future in America, our guests this week argue, if we just think about it differently. Joining us this week are Bhaskar Sunkara and Sarah Leonard, co-editors of of a new essay collection titled “The Future We Want: Radical Ideas for the New Century.”

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African American Cooperatives and Civil Rights: Jessica Gordon Nembhard

 

What role did economic cooperation play in the civil rights movement? As it turns out, a huge one. This forgotten history is the focus of Dr. Jessica Gordon Nembhard's book Collective Courage: A History of African-American Economic Thought and Practice.

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Free the Land: Shirley Sherrod and Black Land Struggles in the South

 

The struggle for Black economic independence: not a lot of people have had a chance to design a new community, to be different and equal, co-owned by its residents. In 1969 Shirley Sherrod co-founded a collective farm in Lee County, Georgia. At 6,000 acres, it was the largest tract of black-owned land in the United States. What happened to the New Communities land trust they planned? Let's just say they were way, way ahead of their time but their time just might be coming back.

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Dara Silverman and Chris Crass: Excerpt

Below is an excerpt from our latest episode, with Chris Crass and Dara Silverman. Watch the full episode here.

Laura: A social justice group that invites white people to fight racism is spreading like wildfire in the United States, from 12 to 150 chapters in just 2 years. Surprised? It may not be making headlines yet, but perhaps we can change that. Clearly, a whole lot of white people are interested in fighting systemic injustice in the United States, so how exactly to do that? Our next guests have dedicated their lives to helping people grapple with that question so as to create real change. They're both organizers, educators, and feminist anti-racist activists themselves.

Dara Silverman is the former executive director of Jews for Racial and Economic Justice. She is currently the national coordinator for SURJ, Showing Up for Racial Justice, the network I mentioned at the top. Chris Crass is the former Coordinator of Catalyst Project, an anti-racist training organization in the Bay Area, and he's the author most recently of Towards the Other America: Anti-Racist Resources for White People Taking Action for Black Lives Matter. Welcome, both. Great to have you.

First let's talk about SURJ. It's truly extraordinary what's been going on, but it's been beneath the radar for most people. What is it and what form is SURJ taking at this point?

 

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