White People In Solidarity Against Racism: Dara Silverman and Chris Crass


A social justice group that invites white people to fight racism is spreading like wildfire in the US. From 12 to 150 chapters in two years. Clearly a whole lot of white people are interested in fighting systemic injustice. But how? This week's guests have dedicated their lives to grappling with that question, for the sake of making real change.

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Uninvited To The Party: The 2016 Republican National Convention

 

In this special episode, the Laura Flanders is at the scene of the Republican National Convention -- but while the party is on inside Quicken Loans Arena, much of Cleveland is still grieving. The 2014 death of Tamir Rice still rests in the minds of many city residents, but it is not the only one.


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Fighting Islamaphobia and Education Apartheid:

 

What is it about Palestine, Islamaphobia, and anti-Arab racism that even many liberal Americans still don’t get? How do the complexities of xenophobia manifest themselves, particularly in relation to increased policing and surveillance? And why hasn’t Obama ended the abuses of the War on Terror? This week’s guests bring us updates from the grassroots. 

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Navigating Oppression: Amy Goodman and Ovarian Psycos

Laura sits down with renowned host and exectuive producer of Democracy Now!, Amy Goodman, to discuss radical media, authenticity, and the questionable necessity of self-care. Also joining us, two members of the Ovarian Psycos Bicycle Brigade, a feminist collective of riders from East LA, and the documentarian covering their story.

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SPECIAL REPORT: Mining and Resistance in Dinétah

 

A special episode-length documentary filmed on location in Dinétah; the name of the land of the Navajo people, spanning parts of Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado and Utah. 21 Billion tons of coal, the largest deposit in the US with an estimated value of 100 billion dollars, lay untouched in Dinétah until 1966. In that year, Peabody Coal Company leased the land in an agreement with a Hopi tribal council they helped form. In 1974, Congress passed the Navajo-Hopi Land Settlement Act, commonly known as “the relocation law." It divided about 2 million acres of land previously shared between Diné and Hopi tribes. Nearly overnight, the homes of tens of thousands of Diné and several hundred Hopi were now illegal.

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What's Wrong With England?

 

Journalist Paul Mason discusses post-capitalism, Middle East correspondent Patrick Cockburn explores ISIS, and Laura asks what’s missing from the LGBTQ Pride celebrations.

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Recovering Our Pride

Transcript:

Laura Flanders: Many places around the world are celebrating LGBTQ pride this month. And lots of them have become a fairly routine part of the calendar, until the deadly attack on the Orlando gay nightclub. In a tragic way that attack has given this year's event some of its old significance.

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Bernie’s Revolution: Socialism and the People's Struggle Against Capitalism

Bernie's success as a mainstream, socialist presidential candidate has taken most commentators by surprise; even after he'd been mathematically counted out of the Democratic nomination race, support for Bernie Sanders kept coming in.

One person who wasn't surprised though, is this week’s guest, Seattle City Council member Kshama Sawant. In 2013, Sawant ran for Seattle City Council on a platform of fighting for a $15/hr minimum wage, rent control and taxing the super-rich to fund mass transit and education. She defeated a 16-year incumbent Democrat to become the first socialist elected in a major US city in decades, and the first socialist on the Seattle city council since 1877.

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A New Economy for Whom? Palak Shah and Yochai Benkler

 

Palak Shah discusses The Good Work Code, an attempt to bring comprehensive worker’s rights to Silicon Valley. And Yochai Benkler asks why the people who create all the content on Facebook - you and me - don’t own it. All that and a commentary from Laura on Apple's questionable borrowing practices.

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No More Debt for Puerto Rico

 

3.5 million Americans in Puerto Rico are in dire crisis. The island territory is mired in debt and facing imminent default. Media coverage has blamed the last twenty years - when tax breaks were rolled back and loans extended. But this week’s guests say the root of Puerto Rico's problems go deeper than that - to US colonial rule. If colonialism's at least in part the culprit here, it's pretty ironic that the solutions on offer from Congress seem so colonial as well.

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